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Former Holby City actress blasts BBC for ditching hospital soap after 23 years

Former Holby City star Pearl Chanda is not happy about the BBC’s decision to end the soap.

The actress – who made her TV debut on the hospital series in 2013 as character Imogen Parker – has told that she believes it is “a real shame” that the channel is getting rid of the much-loved show that has been on air since 1999.

Pearl, 26, praised the beeb for bringing new drama to the screens and “doing some really interesting stuff” but added that she is a soap fan so to see Holby City end is a hard pill to swallow.

She told express.co.uk : “I think to some extent the BBC is doing some amazing work at the moment, bringing amazing TV shows like Normal People.

“And, I May Destroy You, which I was in, I think they are doing some really interesting stuff.”

She added: “I’m a real lover of soaps and I think that kind of television really helps to bring audiences together.

Pearl Chanda is not happy about the BBC’s decision to end Holby City

“They can explore things through those shows in a really interesting way because the audiences are so large. I think it is a real shame that any show like that is cut short.”

Last month, it was announced that Holby City was being axed by the BBC after 23 years on screen, with its final episode set to air in March next year.

The news was broken to fans via the medical drama’s official Twitter account and explained that the “tough decision” had come as a result of the BBC’s commitment to make more programmes across the UK.

They added that Holby would remain on air on Tuesdays until March 2022.

The tweet read: “We’re very sorry to bring you the sad news that Holby City will come to an end in March next year, after 23 amazing years. We are so very grateful to all of Holby’s wonderful cast, crew, writers, producers – and to our millions of loyal viewers and fans for being part of our show.

Former Holby City actress blasts BBC for ditching hospital soap after 23 years
Holby City will end in March next year after 23 years on screen

“This tough decision reflects the BBC’s commitment to make more programmes across the UK and to better reflect, represent and serve all parts of the country.

“Holby will remain on air on Tuesdays until next March, and we will continue to bring you a regular dose of all things Holby right here until then. We promise that Holby will get the send-off it deserves. Thank you for your continued support and love for the series.”

Another statement released by the BBC read: “We are incredibly proud of Holby City but it’s with great sadness that we are announcing that after 23 years, the show will end on screen in March of next year.

“We sometimes have to make difficult decisions to make room for new opportunities and as part of the BBC’s commitment to make more programmes across the UK, we have taken the difficult decision to bring the show to a close in order to reshape the BBC’s drama slate to better reflect, represent and serve all parts of the country.

“We would like to take this opportunity to thank the amazing team at BBC Studios and all the cast and crew who have been involved in the show since 1999.

“Holby has been a stalwart with audiences, delighting millions of viewers each week and winning hundreds of awards with a compelling mix of cutting edge medical stories and explosive personal stories.

“We look forward to working with the team over the coming months to ensure that when it ends, Holby goes out on a high.”

Holby City was first launched in 1999 as a spin-off from Casualty and has been nominated for over 100 television awards over the years and has been praised for its emotional and hard-hitting storylines.

Last year, the medical drama was praised for its moving episode exploring what it had been like for NHS staff working during the pandemic.

Among the celebrity guest actors to appear over the years include Paul O’Grady, Anthony Cotton, Helen Flanagan, Romesh Ranganathan, Kym Marsh, Maureen Lipman and Jodie Comer.

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