Technology

Samsung 980 SSD

By ThinkComputers
on

90

When it comes to performance this is not the fastest Gen3 NVMe drive we’ve tested (at least the 500GB model), but the performance is pretty solid across the board. In CrystalDiskMark we saw sequential read and write speeds of 3185.30 MB/s and 2532.39 MB/s, which is right in line with the advertised speeds of the drive. Having a DRAMless design means that the drive will rely on host memory buffer technology that uses your system’s DRAM instead of an onboard memory chip.

By TweakTown
on

95

Samsung once again reminds us why they are a leader in the storage industry, with the best DRAMless SSD on the market.

By TechRadar
on

80

The Samsung 980 is a far cry from the 980 Pro. Though that’s to be expected, since it’s a PCIe 3.0 model, it doesn’t do as great a job leading the pack as past Samsung SSDs have done. It’s a strong drive, but just edged out by the competition at pretty much every angle.

By KitGuru
on

80

It has taken a while but at last Samsung has brought out a drive to take the place of the highly successful and popular SSD 970 EVO. Only time will tell if it matches its predecessor’s popularity and it is entering into a fiercely competitive market segment.

By eTeknix
on

90

Given similar performing drives are ever so slightly cheaper, it is hard to recommend this on a price scale. However, being a Samsung drive you do have that added bit of security so if you can find one at a good price, don’t hesitate too much. Don’t forget that 5-year warranty if you need that extra peace of mind when purchasing.

By Tom’s Hardware
on

80

If you aren’t looking for the best of the best like Samsung’s 980 Pro but still want solid performance for large files or graphics-heavy games at a more affordable price point, Samsung’s 980 is worth your consideration.

By WindowsCentral
on

80

Samsung’s new 980 SSD is its newest budget NVMe drive and while ditching the DRAM, it doesn’t seem to falter in its performance.

By The Guru of 3D
on

80

Value doesn’t mean bad, contrary, it’s a fabulous performing product, that pSLC VIVO buffer is a bit of magic all by itself, especially on the 1TB model at 160GB writes before you hit any sort of TLC hole, that’s value. Remember though that with smaller volume sizes, that bugger also is smaller as well as overall performance.

By PCMag
on

90

Samsung’s SSD 980 M.2 drive provides a stellar mid-tier option for new or returning fans of the company’s SSDs, squeaking the most performance possible out of PCI Express 3.0 in 2021.

By The SSD Review
on

85

The new Samsung 980 NVMe SSD is a DRAM-less SSD like no other. With top performance, a great warranty and very low pricing, this SSD is a great purchase choice.

By LegitReviews
on

90

The Samsung SSD 980 series shows that DRAM-less drives can deliver solid performance and PCIe Gen 3 drives are going to be around for a long time.

By PCWorld
on

70

The Samsung 980 is affordable, but it’s no barn-burning Samsung 980 Pro. The 980’s reliance on system DRAM as its primary cache results in significantly slower random file performance. If your needs are simple this may not be an issue, but other drives don’t have this limitation.

By AnandTech
on

Intel’s QLC-based solution offers higher capacities, but Samsung’s DRAMless TLC solution should have the clear advantage in performance below 1TB. Entry level NVMe drives that top out at 2.5 GB/s are starting to look inadequate even if their real-world performance still holds up well. Western Digital’s WD Blue SN550 isn’t quite out of the running yet, but it could use an update. Most of the other entry-level NVMe SSDs will have to keep their pricing well under those drives to stay competitive.

By PCPer
on

Samsung’s new SSD 980 is a new competitor in the mature Gen3 storage arena, and provides a value-oriented option with its simplified DRAMless design. Still, that didn’t affect performance the way that we’ve seen from other such SSDs in the past, as Samsung’s implementation of HMB, large write buffer, and 3-bit per cell NAND rather than QLC, keeps this very competitive outside of more demanding (and write-heavy) workloads.

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